So I was at Hay Festival and this lady wore a Sweater saying Gainsbourg is God and I thought… #BellaFreud #Ginsberg

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… Please God say it’s an imitation of Bella Freud’s Ginsberg is God sweater that I have coveted ever since I saw Kate Moss wear it in a ElleGirl 2003 magazine candid shot. The man next to her says “Oh I got this from Cos.” (Completely teasing me!) Then the lady answers: “It’s Bella Freud” and I’m like “Oh is it $300 bucks?” And she confirms it is meaning it’s the same designer and same price point that is well out of my reach because I am a mere Poet.

So here’s the jumper she was wearing…

 

 [Discovering Serge Gainsbourg and Beat Bohemian Apparel]

 

If you’re a Rich Poet (total oxymoron) then like yeah… Go buy one here. Or if you’re a kind-hearted Poet/Artist/Nouveau Bohemian/Preppy Bohemian please do buy one for me! [Size XL, please message me on Facebook so you know where to post it.]

Evidently this is a nod to Serge Gainsbourg the French singer, painter and musician, who I would not have known the name of but for the Gainsbourg v Ginsberg Jumper probing at Hay. Naturally, I already recognised the sound of Gainsbourg’s music, I just didn’t know his name.

So have a listen.


Source

So here it is in all its knitted literary splendor. I was actually imaging to wear this piece with black skinny jeans and white tennis shoes (to be an ironic Beatnik which is so not ‘Beat’ and the white tennis shoes is a bit Hipsterish but I secretly like it and would just end up Bohemianizing the whole look anyway.)

Regardless, Kate’s Look is sooo much better.

 

 

Gift yourself one now Sweetie!
Buy

 

GINSBERG IS GOD
EAU DE PARFUM

£85.00

This unisex fragrance is inspired by Allen Ginsberg, the tousled headed poet surrounded by books and papers – the scent of green leaves and spring drifting in through the open windows. The heady scent is laced with notes of Frankincense, Wormwood and Leather with spicy hints of Black Pepper. Size: 50ml.

They also have candles and menswear (if I had a boyfriend I would soooo get him The Last Poets jumper even if he had a square job.)

 

 

For The Boyfriend
Buy here

 


Anyhoo, a bit more about Bella Freud. Yes, she’s the daughter of Lucian Freud and the grand-daughter of Sigmund Freud (the man that wrote an essay titled “Fetishism” and dribble-dabbled about “penis envy.”)

If you can’t get to her shop at 49 Chiltern Street, London then visit BellaFreud.com

 

If you’re lucky enough to be able to afford the sweater that I’ve always wanted since I was 13 then go show it off on instagram and tag her shop: @Bella_Freud 

Bit of homework… You could watch this short film Bella wrote and directed and psychoanalyze it to Sigmund’s theories…

Bohemian Prep?

Hello, World.

As I mentioned in a previous post, my friends and I went shopping this weekend to get some new spring clothes, and just look around. While shopping, I told one of my friends that I have this internal struggle with either having really preppy style or totally bohemian, hippie style. She shared my struggle, and it got me thinking… is there such thing as bohemian prep? Does a style like this exist? Is it possible to love the tailored, clean lines of Audrey Hepburn’s era, but also adore Kate Moss? I love fashion, but sometimes I feel like style can be treated like genres, and you must fit within a certain box, or you confuse your peers. Now that I’m thinking about it, my music taste shares this struggle where I like a ton of different genres…maybe I’m just a constant confusion? I don’t know, but what I…

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Crucifying the Flesh

D e n y
Y o u r s e l f . . .

The Jesus Question

The title of this painting by Anthony Falbo is a reference to Galatians 5:24: “And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.”

This theme rings throughout Paul’s other writings as well:

  • “For we know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves to sin.” (Romans 6:6)
  • “. . . if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live.” (Romans 8:13)
  • “I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me.” (Galatians 2:20)
  • “May I never boast except in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, through which the world has been crucified to me, and I to the world.” (Galatians 6:14)

Crucifying the Flesh by Anthony Falbo Anthony…

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Jack Kerouac, Music Journalist

Stephanie Nikolopoulos

When Jack Kerouac went off to Columbia University, he told people he was going to be a journalist.  His father, Leo Kerouac, was a printer in Lowell, who owned a print shop called Spotlight Print.  Leo handled printing for some of the big businesses in New England, and also did a bit of writing of his own.  This inspired Ti Jean, as little Jack was called.  He used to lay on the floor, creating his own little newspapers and comics.

In school in New York, first at Horace Mann prep school and then at Columbia, Kerouac contributed to the school newspapers.  The writing he did for the papers would best be described as music journalism.  He soaked in all the great 1940s bebop of Harlem and wrote jazz reviews.

There was no Pitchfork at the time.  Rolling Stone magazine wasn’t founded until 1967.  Even many of today’s popular jazz…

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John Mayer – I Will Be Found (Lost At Sea)

 

It doesn’t matter where you roam
When no one’s left to call you home
I might have strained a bit too far
I’m countin’ all the moonlit stars

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

But I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

Somedays, I think it’s all okay
Some nights, I throw it all away
I saw her face and I could tell
My ghost had left the town as well

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

But I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

I’m a little lost at sea
I’m a little birdie in a big old tree
Ain’t nobody looking for me
Here out on the highway

Baby, I’m a runaway train
Baby, I’m a feather in a hurricane
Maybe it’s a long grey game
But maybe that’s a good thing

‘Cause I will be found
I will be found
When my time comes down
I will be found

So I keep runnin’ ’til my run is gone
Keep on ridin’ ’til I see that dawn
And I will be found
I will be found

 

Jack Kerouac Dropped Out of College. So What?

Stephanie Nikolopoulos

Is genius born or created?  By now everyone has read, or at least heard, about how Steve Jobs dropped out of Reed College and went on to become the cofounder of Apple and one of the most important entrepreneurs of our time.  Perhaps less known is the fact that Jobs continued to audit classes at Reed.  He actually credited a calligraphy course he took as having a major impact on the Mac.  When I was taking a shuttle from the San Francisco airport to my hotel out in Walnut Creek, I had a midnight conversation with a businessman who had read the biography on Jobs and told me about how the computer genius’ interest in art was fundamental to his vision for building a successful brand.

Back in September, Flavorwire posted an article called “10 Famous Authors Who Dropped Out of School.”  This is what they wrote about Jack Kerouac:

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The Bohemian Bookshelf (Part 1)

Related imageBohemianism is a way of life, a state of mind and an atmosphere. It is not a trend, it’s a timeless movement. Bohemian Manifesto is the first book to distill all the ingredients of Bohemian life. In witty and engaging style, Laren Stover lets the reader into the contents of a Bohemian closet, bathroom and bookshelf. She explains the allure of absinthe, why it isn’t wise to leave a Bohemian unattended in your house – you could return to find nude nymphs painted on your lampshade – and how to identify what type of Bohemian you may be.

Bohemian Manifesto: A Field Guide to Living on the Edge by Laren Stover
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Image result for ways of seeing

Based on the BBC television series, John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is a unique look at the way we view art, published as part of the Penguin on Design series in Penguin Modern Classics.

“Seeing comes before words. The child looks and recognizes before it can speak.”

“But there is also another sense in which seeing comes before words. It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world; we explain that world with words, but word can never undo the fact that we are surrounded by it. The relation between what we see and what we know is never settled.”

John Berger’s Ways of Seeing is one of the most stimulating and influential books on art in any language. First published in 1972, it was based on the BBC television series about which the Sunday Times critic commented: ‘This is an eye-opener in more ways than one: by concentrating on how we look at paintings . . . he will almost certainly change the way you look at pictures.’

Ways of Seeing by John Berger
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Image result for a moveable feastPublished posthumously in 1964, A Moveable Feast remains one of Ernest Hemingway’s most beloved works. Since Hemingway’s personal papers were released in 1979, scholars have examined and debated the changes made to the text before publication. Now this new special restored edition presents the original manuscript as the author prepared it to be published.

Featuring a personal foreword by Patrick Hemingway, Ernest’s sole surviving son, and an introduction by the editor and grandson of the author, Seán Hemingway, this new edition also includes a number of unfinished, never-before-published Paris sketches revealing experiences that Hemingway had with his son Jack and his first wife, Hadley. Also included are irreverent portraits of other luminaries, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Madox Ford, and insightful recollections of his own early experiments with his craft.

A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway
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any-warhol

The autobiography of an American icon, Andy Warhol’s The Philosophy of Andy Warhol is published in Penguin Modern Classics.

‘I never think that people die. They just go to department stores’

Andy Warhol – American painter, filmmaker, publisher, actor and major figure in the Pop Art movement – was in many ways a reluctant celebrity. Here, in his autobiography, he spills his secrets and muses about love, sex, food, beauty, fame, work, money, success, New York and America and its place in the world. But it is his reflections on himself, his childhood in McKeesport, Pennsylvania, the explosion of his career in the Sixties and his life among celebrities – from working with Elizabeth Taylor to partying with the Rolling Stones – that give a true insight into the mind of one of the most iconic figures in twentieth-century culture.

The Philosophy of Andy Warhol by Andy Warhol
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Video Review: Fiona Apple “Fast As You Can”

I Want My Pop Culture

In black-and-white, the garage door opens and Fiona Apple stands by it. The camera focuses on parts of her face. Her coat around her shoulders, she begins to sing by the fence. She leans into the camera and walks back into the garage. She touches the screen, smudging it.

Switching to color, she stands in her multi-colored shower and poses as though she’s taking a mugshot.

She stands on the subway platform, the train’s light shining in the distance as it approaches. The angle slides each time, pulling in closer.

On the train, she puts her hands on the poles as she walks along and puts her hand over the camera, covering it.

She wipes a window with a cloth, her face blurred. It changes to the shape of a microwave.

A black smudge is over her face, which she wipes off with her hand as she sits on a…

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