Next time I’m at National Museum Cardiff:

I am rather fond of this museum because it’s FREE and it’s a one hour train ride for me to see a Van Gogh painting!

This was where I first saw with my own eyes a Van Gogh in the Fall of 2010!

Twice I have been on a guided Tour. In 2010 there was one on Post-Impressionists and January 2014 it was about Historic art of the 16th-18th century. With the latter guide I did not actually choose it but it was the only one on that day. It turned out to be so interesting and that’s where I first saw the Katheryn of Berain painting and instantly felt drawn to it…Turns out she was a lady with immense wealth and power-all the things I aspire to!

In the past I always just went to see the pretty impressionist paintings there’s a Van Gogh and Monet! *Swoon* But next time I’ll just broaden my horizons and check out a category I know little about.

Can’t wait to visit again!

For details on the guided tours click below:

https://www.museumwales.ac.uk/whatson/?event_id=4412

To see which artists are on show click:

https://www.museumwales.ac.uk/cardiff/art/


Katheryn of Berain with Catherine The Great (Me)!

Popped into National Museum Cardiff yesterday. It was near closing time so didn’t get much of a chance to look around.

Sneaked in a selfie shot of one of my favourite paintings there: Katheryn of Berain. She was a wealthy heiress of Royal Descent and went on to get married four times to men very established men!

Me and Katheryn of Berain

You’ll notice many portraits of Royals and Aristocrats wearing black in the 16th century. Combined with their often solemn faces on the portraits one may assume the painting displayed bereavement or tragedy. In reality black was the dye hardest to create for garments and most expensive dye to use and smiling was regarded as a foolish expression! Consequently black clothes were worn to display wealth and luxury…Some things never change. This painting is a modern day equivalent of an instagram pic of a Jet Set Babe donning her crocodile Hermès in Monte Carlo.

This oil painting was produced in 1568 by Dutch painter: Adriaen van Cronenburgh. Back then a painting would take a whole year to dry!!!